Admin

4th Founding Leader Checkilist

Founding Leader Overview

Rough Draft Paragraph Due Dates:

Monday, March 5, 2018 -2nd paragraph

Monday, March 12, 2018  -3rd and 4th paragraphs

Monday, March 19, 2018 -Introduction and Conclusion paragraphs

Final report due Monday, March 26,2018.

REQUIREMENTS – these must be included:

  • Cover sheet/Title page
  • Title of the project
  • Student’s name  
  • Teacher’s name
  • Due Date

    Picture (optional)
  • Photo collage

    * A minimum of 5 photos pertaining to the founding leader and his/her life

    * Each picture needs to have the following written beneath it:

    Identification of the event

    Date

    Names of people

    Remember that one of the photos must be:

    One photo from the person’s papers. (A person's "papers" include anything authored by a person, such as letters, diary, dispatches, sermons, speeches.)

  • Bibliography page -  www.easybib.com

  • Your report can be typed (12 point font and double space) OR handwritten in your best cursive (in pen)

  • Rough draft paragraphs required to be turned in each week and in with final report

Structure and Paragraph Requirements:

Make choices about what to include. What were this person’s most important achievements? What were the most important events in his life?

INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH:

  • Topic sentence introduces the person (e.g., a signer of the Declaration of Independence, John Hancock.)

  • The 2nd, 3rd and 4th sentences introduce the topics of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th paragraphs.

  • The concluding sentence ends the paragraph.

SECOND PARAGRAPH:  This paragraph should be about the president’s life aside from politics.

  • Early life

  • Family background

  • Childhood

  • Adult life outside of their contributions to the founding of our country

  • Events in chronological order.

THIRD PARAGRAPH:  Discuss how the person got involved with the beginning of the country.   

  • Complete explanation of how they became involved in the founding of the country

  • Including: Career, family, or location influences; Inspiring events

  • Events in chronological order.

FOURTH PARAGRAPH: The fourth paragraph should explain your opinion on why this person was vital to the early years of our country.  

  • Evidence Chart organizing your opinion - SUBMITTED with rough draft

  • Thorough summarization on why the person was vital

  • Evidence and support for your opinion are clearly stated with sources cited.  

  • Accomplishments and contributions to the formation and/or early years of the United States

CONCLUSION PARAGRAPH:

  • No new facts are introduced about the president.

  • Main contributions are summarized

  • Vitality to the formation of the United States is restated clearly

  • Conclusion mirrors or complements the introductory paragraph


EVIDENCE CHART

COMPLETE AND SUBMIT WITH YOUR FOURTH PARAGRAPH


Position:

Evidence:  What is your evidence they were vital?  List your reasons.

Support:  Tell more about your evidence and its importance.

Benefit:  How were things better because of their actions?





Transition Words


To improve your writing, you need to make sure that your ideas, both in sentences and paragraphs, stick together or have coherence. The gap between ideas needs to be bridged smoothly. One way to do this is by using transitions - words or phrases or techniques that help bring two ideas together. Transitional words and phrases represent one way of gaining coherence. Certain words help continue an idea, indicate a shift of thought or contrast, or sum up a conclusion. Check the following list of words to find those that will pull your sentences and paragraphs together.


For continuing a common line of reasoning:


consequently

additionally

moreover

in the same way

clearly, then

and

because

following this further

furthermore

in addition

besides that

also

pursuing this further

in the light of the... it is easy to see that



 

To change the line of reasoning (contrast):


however

nevertheless

but

yet

on the other hand

on the contrary




For opening a paragraph initially or for general use:


admittedly

no doubt

undoubtedly

at this level

assuredly

of course

unquestionably

in this situation

certainly

to be sure

generally speaking


granted

true

in general


 

For the final points of a paragraph or essay:


finally

lastly

eventually

ultimately

Transitional chains, to use in separating sections of a paragraph which is arranged chronologically:


first... second... third...

generally... furthermore... finally

in the first place... also... lastly

in the first place... pursuing this further... finally

to be sure... additionally... lastly

in the first place... just in the same way... finally

basically... similarly... as well



To signal conclusion:


therefore

this

hence

in final analysis

in conclusion

in final consideration

indeed



To restate a point within a paragraph in another way or in a more exacting way:


in other words

in point of fact

specifically

more precisely


 Sequence or time:


after

at last

first... second... third

meanwhile

afterwards

before

in the first place

next

as soon as

before long

in the meantime

soon

at first

finally

later

then


Website by SchoolMessenger Presence. © 2019 West Corporation. All rights reserved.